COVID-19 TE PUKE REGION

This website is for health information and advice about coronavirus (COVID-19) for Te Puke District Residents, how to prevent and protect yourself from disease, important updates and frequently asked questions.

BOP Cases
47
WBOP Cases
46
EBOP Cases
1
NZ Cases
1,503
NZ Recovered
1,442
NZ Deaths
21
* Last updated: May 19, 2020, 13:00 GMT
Official Sources: Ministry of Health & Toi Te Ora


This website was brought to you by Vector Group Charitable Trust
Vector Group Charitable Trust - Envisioning Sustainable Communities Creatively

Te Puke Coronavirus Update (COVID- 19)
Western Bay of Plenty

If you are concerned you or someone in your bubble may have symptoms of COVID19 then please present to the CBAC (Community Based Assessment Centre) located at Baypark, Mt Maunganui between 9-4pm on weekdays and 10-2pm on weekends. Symptoms may include cough, sore throat, shortness of breath, cold symptoms, and loss of smell/taste, with or without fever. You do not need a referral to attend this.

More information about the testing centre and the Bay of Plenty’s COVID response can be found at https://covid19.bopdhb.govt.nz/

If you have other concerns then please phone the practice on 075739511 for assistance. It’s important you still approach your health professionals with any other health issues. We are here to help.

Our opening hours are 8am to 5pm Monday to Friday. Unfortunately, we will not be open on Saturdays until further notice and we are no longer offering walk in clinics.

General Practice services:

  • GPs: all our GPs are available for appointments. Please ring reception to book with your usual GP. They will then call you for a phone consultation. Please tell reception if you think it is urgent. Normal consult fees apply. If during the telephone consult, your GP decides a face-to-face consult is necessary, then this will be booked for you and no additional charge will be incurred. If you are asked to come to the practice, we ask that you please remain in your car and phone us when you arrive. You will then be guided by reception staff where to go. Due to hygiene and personal protection practices, things may take a little longer than usual and we thank-you for your patience.
    • Please note we will not be accepting payment at the desk.  Invoices will be emailed or posted following your consult. We ask that you please pay via Bank Transfer Te Puke Medical Centre bank account 03 0435 0025354 00. Please quote your name and reference number when paying so we can identify who the payment relates to.

 

  • Prescriptions: will be sent directly to your pharmacy of choice, or dropped to our on-site pharmacy. During the lock-down period, scripts can’t be collected from the practice. The repeat script fee will be $20.00 ($15 for CSC). Please allow 48hrs for collection of these from the pharmacy.

 

  • Child Vaccinations: we are continuing to provide these as it is important to have these immunisations when they’re due. We ask that only one parent accompany a child during the vaccination.

 

  • Pathlab Te Puke: is open during this period but only Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays 8-4pm. Pathlab Mount Maunganui is open as per usual. The laboratory has asked our doctors to only request blood tests that will affect immediate management of patients.

 

  • Radiology: is available but is limited and requires appointments to be booked by your GP. As you are aware our local Te Puke Bay Radiology closed in 2019, so our closest location remains Papamoa or Mount Maunganui.

 

  • Flu vaccines: are being administered to those patients eligible for a funded vaccine. We are running Flu clinics as stock allows us. These will be administered at the front of our building. We ask you to practice social distancing of at least 2m if there are other people waiting too. Please do not attend if you have any fever or respiratory symptoms. You can phone us instead so we can manage how we see you. Under current guidelines we ask that you remain on site in your car for 5mins after the vaccine. If it is your first vaccine, we will need you to remain for 20mins.

 

  • Flutracking: is an online survey which asks if you have had a fever or cough in the last week. The Ministry of Health is encouraging patients to register online as this is a practical step everyone can do to help monitor flu and COVID-19 testing throughout NZ:   flutracking.net

We thank you for your patience during this challenging period and rest assured, Te Puke Medical Centre follows strict  Infection Control Protocols to ensure our staff and patients are safe and protected. Keep well.

Heathline 0800 611 116


Here is a video on Coronavirus easily explained for kids.
https://www.facebook.com/VectorGroupNZ/videos/673470433413559
Children’s well-being is connected to your well-being
Helping children and young people cope with the changes caused by the COVID-19 (Coronavirus) means providing accurate information, discussing facts without causing undue alarm, and re-establishing routines.
You are an important role model for children and young people. Staying calm and enabling time and space to be together with children will help them adjust to this “new normal”. Here is a great article on helping children and young people while they are learning at home.


Latest Developments

1. Government Order effective from 6pm April 3
As of yesterday new laws were passed re: COVID-19 lockdown rules. No swimming, surfing, hunting or do any activity exposing participants to danger or that may require help from rescue services.

New border measures announced The Government has announced further border measures restricting entry to New Zealand. Only New Zealand residents and citizens (and their children and partners) will be permitted to enter New Zealand. (This includes the Realm countries, Australian citizens and permanent residents ordinarily resident in New Zealand, airline and marine crew).

2.Tauranga COVID-19 Assessment Centre moved to Baypark.
Read more here.

3.Freedom camper specific sites for lockdown
The three remaining freedom camp sites open that have the necessary facilities and hygiene precautions in place are:
-Commerce Lane car park, Te Puke
-Marine Park, Tauranga
-Uretara Domain, Katikati
Click to download this document for more information on the locations of freedom camping sites and facilities.

4. MAKETU IS NOW CLOSED TO ALL NON-RESIDENTS
See more info here.

Te Puke District Information

Useful links

Ministry of Health – https://www.health.govt.nz/

National COVID19 information – https://covid19.govt.nz/

BOP COVID19 information – https://covid19.bopdhb.govt.nz/

Te Puke COVID19 information – https://covid19tepuke.fyi/

Te Puke community support – http://www.empowermentnz.org.nz/

If you need help with depression and anxiety – https://www.justathought.co.nz/

Resources for managing your mental health – https://depression.org.nz/

To help the national flu tracking – https://info.flutracking.net/

Reporting breaches of any Level 4 Alert restrictions www.police.govt.nz/105support

ESSENTIAL SOCIAL SERVICES IN TAURANGA AND THE WESTERN BAY OF PLENTY
Sociallink has a list of essential services on their website.

Healthline – 0800 358 5453
Government helpline – 0800 779 997 (8am–1am, 7 days a week).
If you’re unable to obtain essential food and medication

– Bay of Plenty Civil Defence Group Call Centre – 0800 884 222 (7am to 7pm, 7 days)

For counselling support – call or text 1737
Essential business enquiries – essential@mbie.govt.nz or 0800 22 66 57

For financial or employer wage subsidy assistance – WINZ – 0800 40 80 40

Women’s refuge 0800 733 843 (0800 REFUGE) 24hrs

Family Services 211 Helpline (0800 211 211)

NZ Police – if urgent 111, not so urgent 105

Essential Services OPEN in Te Puke
Please email steve@vectorgroup.org.nz to submit any information.

Medical Centres and Maori hauora providers
Maketu Hauora, stay up to date on their Facebook page.
Nga Kakano GP, Please call 07 573-0660 or text 027 554 1118 if you need a doctors or nurse appointment. All initial appointments are virtual by phone. Do not come to the Clinic unless the GP has asked you to come in. Keep up to date on their Facebook page.
Poutiri Trust
Te Puke Medical Centre, We are no longer running “Walk-in” clinics. Phone 07 573 9511 – Do Not Enter Our Premises
Te Puke Pathlab - Open Monday, Wednesday and Friday 8-4pm. NOT for Covid 19 testing, just for regular blood testing
Waitaha Health Centre

Te Puke Veterinary Centre

Homeless & Social services
EmpowermentNZ are the official foodbank in our district. 🌿 As we are a Social Service Provider we are considered an Essential Business and our Food Bank will be remaining in operation during this time of Level 3 - 4 isolation.
🌿 Our morning Community Cafe is now CLOSED.
👉 So what does this look like for EmpowermentNZ and our other services?

🌿 Food Bank will be opperating during our normal business hours:
Monday 10 - 2
Tuesday CLOSED
Wednesday 10 - 2
Thursday CLOSED
Friday 10 - 2
🌿 Our usual criteria for recieving support remain the same and these will be discussed with you at the time. 🌿 All of our processes will be completed by phone and no one will be allowed to enter our building. Please phone us to discuss how we can support you and we will arrange times for you to arrive and pick up your parcel from outside our door.

-If you have no credit or minutes you can txt us and ask us to call you back. Or you can PM our page. 🌿 Please note that all calls, txts, PMs will only be responded to during our work hours.

📞 PHONE NUMBERS 📞
The Hub: 07 975 0157
Social Workers:
Georgie: 021 147 0076
Tangi: 021 0869 4766

Nga Kakano Community Service. Keep up to date on their Facebook page. Nga Kakano is also running low in flu vaccinations. Call 07 573 0660 or text 027 554 1118 if you want to book in for a flu vaccine.

Supermarkets
Countdown Te Puke, opening hours - 9am to 8pm

New World Te Puke, opening hours 8am to 8pm.
EASTER SUNDAY WE ARE CLOSED
Safe 2m metre distancing must be upheld
Flour - pre packaged flour is available limit 1 per customer
Leave tote bags in car if using a trolly, pack trolley again after checkout.

Petrol Stations
BP Te Puke
Gull Te Puke
Z - Te Puke

Rubbish Collection

Te Puke Recycling Centre is NOT OPERATIONAL
Waste Collectors and Collection Days, Kerbside rubbish collection continues but all recycling must be placed in with regular rubbish.

Pharmacies in Te Puke
Life Pharmacy Te Puke
EASTER HOURS: Frid closed, Sat 9am-1pm, Sun and Mon closed. No flu vaccinations on Sat.

My Pharmacy Te Puke
Unichem Te Puke Pharmarcy

Our local pharmacies have adopted strict procedures on accessing their stores. My Pharmacy Te Puke is offering a delivery service and online payment. You can contact them on 07 573 9868 or visit their Facebook page. For information on Life Pharmacy Te Puke visit their Facebook page.

Western Bay of Plenty District Council

All libraries, service centres, swimming pools and recycling centres are closed. Detailed information on what Council services continue can be found here

Kiwifruit Industry
Eastpack
Trevalyans

The kiwifruit industry is an essential business. The Te Puke district is currently immersed in activity. The industry is doing everything possible to ensure the safety of people. They have adopted special rules for social distancing, hygiene, protective equipment & reduced access to sites. Support for the industry is critical - our local economy and communities and our contribution to the national economic effort.

Agriculture

Dairy farming is another essential business. Other farming activity is also essential and registration/confirmation as an essential business is very fluid in this current environment. Agriculture is a very significant contributor to the Te Puke economy and our various communities. As is the case with the kiwifruit industry, it is important we offer them our full support.

WBOP Mayor's
update



Download confirmed and probable case data (Excel, 54 KB)

Bay of Plenty Civil Defence Emergency Management call centre launched

Bay of Plenty Civil Defence Emergency Management has launched a new 0800 number helping Bay of Plenty households meet essential needs during the national rāhui period. The number is 0800 884 222 The call centre will be open from 7am – 7pm, 7 days a week.

With so much information in mainstream media and social media, including a vast amount of misinformation, it is important to stay connected to the official Government site. There is continually updated information on self isolation, essential services and financial support. Visit the site here

Access to and conduct during shopping is important.

One of Te Puke's two major supermarkets New World Te Puke has released these informative videos

What you need to know


|
How coronavirus is spread

Transmission of
COVID-19

Because it's a new illness, we do not know exactly how coronavirus spreads from person to person. Similar viruses are spread in cough droplets.

Person-to-person spread as close contact with infected

The coronavirus is thought to spread mainly from person to person. This can happen between people who are in close contact with one another.

Touching or contact with infected surfaces or objects

A person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes.

Droplets that from infected person coughs or sneezes

The coronavirus is thought to spread mainly from person to person. This can happen between people who are in close contact with one another.



What are the symptoms of COVID-19?

Symptoms of Coronavirus

The most common symptoms of COVID-19 are fever, tiredness, and dry cough. Some patients may have aches and pains, nasal congestion, runny nose, sore throat or diarrhea. These symptoms are usually mild and begin gradually. Also the symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure.

Call 111 if you have a medical emergency: If you have a medical emergency and need to call 111, notify the operator that you have or think you might have, COVID-19. If possible, put on a facemask before medical help arrives.

Fever

High Fever – this means you feel hot to touch on your chest or back (you do not need to measure your temperature). It is a common sign and also may appear in 2-10 days if you affected.

Cough

Continuous cough – this means coughing a lot for more than an hour, or 3 or more coughing episodes in 24 hours (if you usually have a cough, it may be worse than usual).

Shortness of breath

Difficulty breathing – Around 1 out of every 6 people who gets COVID-19 becomes seriously ill and develops difficulty breathing or shortness of breath.

Stay at home and call your doctor: If you develop emergency warning signs for COVID-19 get medical attention immediately. Emergency warning signs include*: Trouble breathing, Persistent pain or pressure in the chest, New confusion or inability to arouse, Bluish lips or face, *This list is not all inclusive. Please consult your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning.



How to Protect Yourself?

Prevention
& advice

There is currently no vaccine to prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus. Stay aware of the latest information on the COVID-19 outbreak, available on the WHO website and through Ministry of Health and Unite Against COVID-19.

Wash your hands frequently

Regularly and thoroughly clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand rub or wash them with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.

Maintain social distancing

Maintain at least 2 metre distance between yourself & anyone, especially those who are coughing or sneezing. If you are too close, you may get infected.

Avoid touching face

Hands touch many surfaces and can pick up viruses. So, hands can transfer the virus to your eyes, nose or mouth and can make you sick.

Practice respiratory hygiene

Maintain good respiratory hygiene as covering your mouth & nose with your bent elbow or tissue when you cough or sneeze.

Take steps to protect others

  • Stay home if you’re sick – except to get medical care.
  • Cover your mouth and nose – with a tissue when you cough or sneeze (throw used tissues in the trash) or use the inside of your elbow.
  • Wear a facemask if you are sick – You should wear a facemask when you are around other people (e.g., sharing a room or vehicle) and before you enter healthcare provider’s
  • Clean AND disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily – This includes phones, tables, light switches, doorknobs, countertops, handles, desks, toilets, taps, and sinks.
  • Clean the dirty surfaces – Use detergent or soap and water prior to disinfection.
  • Stay informed about the local COVID-19 situation – Get up-to-date information about local COVID-19 activity from Unite Against COVID-19
  • Dedicated, lined trash can – If possible, dedicate a lined trash can for the ill person. Use gloves when removing garbage bags, and handling & disposing of trash.

Follow steps to
wash hands

Why do I need wash hand
Soap on Hand
Palm to Palm
Between Fingers
Back to Hands
Clean with Water
Focus on Wrist


Be carefull & Stay Safe

Treatment for coronavirus

To date, there is no vaccine and no specific antiviral medicine to prevent or treat COVID-2019. However, those affected should receive care to relieve symptoms. People with serious illness should be hospitalized. Most patients recover thanks to supportive care.

Antibiotics do not help, as they do not work against viruses. Treatment aims to relieve the symptoms while your body fights the illness. You'll need to stay in isolation, away from other people, until you have recovered.

Common signs of infection include respiratory symptoms, fever, cough, shortness of breath and breathing difficulties. In more severe cases, infection can cause pneumonia, severe acute respiratory syndrome, kidney failure and even death.

Standard recommendations to prevent infection spread include regular hand washing, covering mouth and nose when coughing and sneezing, thoroughly cooking meat and eggs. Avoid close contact with anyone showing symptoms of respiratory illness such as coughing and sneezing.

Self Care

If you have mild symptoms, stay at home until you’ve recovered. You can relieve your symptoms if you:

  • Rest and sleep
  • Keep warm
  • Drink plenty of liquids
  • Use a room humidifier or take a hot shower to help ease a sore throat and cough
Medical Treatments

If you develop a fever, cough, and have difficulty breathing, promptly seek medical care. Call in advance and tell your health provider of any recent travel or recent contact with travelers.

Do’s & Don’ts

Protect yourself

The best thing you can do now is plan for how you can adapt your daily routine. Take a few steps to protect yourself, and clean your hands often. Avoid close contact, Cover coughs and sneezes, clean daily used surfaces etc. The best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus.

Avoid Close Contact
Don’t Touch Face
Don't Mingle
Wash Your Hands
Drink Water
Use a Face Mask
Frequently Asked Questions

Common Question
& Answer

The Coronavirus (COVID-19) was first reported in Wuhan, Hubei, China in December 2019, the outbreak was later recognized as a pandemic by the World Health Organization (WHO) on 11 March 2020.

COVID-19 is a new illness that can affect your lungs and airways. It's caused by a virus called coronavirus. It was discovered in December 2019 in Wuhan, Hubei, China.

What is a novel coronavirus?

On February 11, 2020 the World Health Organization announced an official name for the disease that is causing the 2019 novel coronavirus outbreak, first identified in Wuhan China. The new name of this disease is coronavirus disease 2019, abbreviated as COVID-19. In COVID-19, ‘CO’ stands for ‘corona,’ ‘VI’ for ‘virus,’ and ‘D’ for disease. Formerly, this disease was referred to as “2019 novel coronavirus” or “2019-nCoV”.

A novel coronavirus is a new coronavirus that has not been previously identified. The virus causing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), is not the same as the coronaviruses that commonly circulate among humans and cause mild illness, like the common cold.

On February 11, 2020 the World Health Organization announced an official name for the disease that is causing the 2019 novel coronavirus outbreak, first identified in Wuhan China. The new name of this disease is coronavirus disease 2019, abbreviated as COVID-19. In COVID-19, ‘CO’ stands for ‘corona,’ ‘VI’ for ‘virus,’ and ‘D’ for disease. Formerly, this disease was referred to as “2019 novel coronavirus” or “2019-nCoV”.

There are many types of human coronaviruses including some that commonly cause mild upper-respiratory tract illnesses. COVID-19 is a new disease, caused be a novel (or new) coronavirus that has not previously been seen in humans. The name of this disease was selected following the World Health Organization (WHO) best practiceexternal icon for naming of new human infectious diseases.

People can fight stigma and help, not hurt, others by providing social support. Counter stigma by learning and sharing facts. Communicating the facts that viruses do not target specific racial or ethnic groups and how COVID-19 actually spreads can help stop stigma.

People in the U.S. may be worried or anxious about friends and relatives who are living in or visiting areas where COVID-19 is spreading. Some people are worried about the disease. Fear and anxiety can lead to social stigma, for example, towards Chinese or other Asian Americans or people who were in quarantine.

Stigma is discrimination against an identifiable group of people, a place, or a nation. Stigma is associated with a lack of knowledge about how COVID-19 spreads, a need to blame someone, fears about disease and death, and gossip that spreads rumors and myths.

Stigma hurts everyone by creating more fear or anger towards ordinary people instead of the disease that is causing the problem.

What is the source of the virus?

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses. Some cause illness in people, and others, such as canine and feline coronaviruses, only infect animals. Rarely, animal coronaviruses that infect animals have emerged to infect people and can spread between people. This is suspected to have occurred for the virus that causes COVID-19. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) are two other examples of coronaviruses that originated from animals and then spread to people. More information about the source and spread of COVID-19 is available on the Situation Summary: Source and Spread of the Virus.

This virus was first detected in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China. The first infections were linked to a live animal market, but the virus is now spreading from person-to-person. It’s important to note that person-to-person spread can happen on a continuum. Some viruses are highly contagious (like measles), while other viruses are less so.

The virus that causes COVID-19 seems to be spreading easily and sustainably in the community (“community spread”) in some affected geographic areas. Community spread means people have been infected with the virus in an area, including some who are not sure how or where they became infected.

Learn what is known about the spread of newly emerged coronaviruses.

The virus that causes COVID-19 is spreading from person-to-person. Someone who is actively sick with COVID-19 can spread the illness to others. That is why CDC recommends that these patients be isolated either in the hospital or at home (depending on how sick they are) until they are better and no longer pose a risk of infecting others.

How long someone is actively sick can vary so the decision on when to release someone from isolation is made on a case-by-case basis in consultation with doctors, infection prevention and control experts, and public health officials and involves considering specifics of each situation including disease severity, illness signs and symptoms, and results of laboratory testing for that patient.

Current CDC guidance for when it is OK to release someone from isolation is made on a case by case basis and includes meeting all of the following requirements:

  • The patient is free from fever without the use of fever-reducing medications.
  • The patient is no longer showing symptoms, including cough.
  • The patient has tested negative on at least two consecutive respiratory specimens collected at least 24 hours apart.

Someone who has been released from isolation is not considered to pose a risk of infection to others.

It is not yet known whether weather and temperature impact the spread of COVID-19. Some other viruses, like the common cold and flu, spread more during cold weather months but that does not mean it is impossible to become sick with these viruses during other months. At this time, it is not known whether the spread of COVID-19 will decrease when weather becomes warmer. There is much more to learn about the transmissibility, severity, and other features associated with COVID-19 and investigations are ongoing.

Coronaviruses are generally thought to be spread from person-to-person through respiratory droplets. Currently there is no evidence to support transmission of COVID-19 associated with food. Before preparing or eating food it is important to always wash your hands with soap and water for 20 seconds for general food safety. Throughout the day wash your hands after blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing, or going to the bathroom.

It may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.

In general, because of poor survivability of these coronaviruses on surfaces, there is likely very low risk of spread from food products or packaging that are shipped over a period of days or weeks at ambient, refrigerated, or frozen temperatures.

Learn what is known about the spread of COVID-19.

Community spread means people have been infected with the virus in an area, including some who are not sure how or where they became infected.

What can I do to protect myself and prevent the spread of disease?
Protection measures for everyone

Stay aware of the latest information on the COVID-19 outbreak, available on the WHO website and through your national and local public health authority. Many countries around the world have seen cases of COVID-19 and several have seen outbreaks. Authorities in China and some other countries have succeeded in slowing or stopping their outbreaks. However, the situation is unpredictable so check regularly for the latest news.

You can reduce your chances of being infected or spreading COVID-19 by taking some simple precautions:

  • Regularly and thoroughly clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand rub or wash them with soap and water.
    Why? Washing your hands with soap and water or using alcohol-based hand rub kills viruses that may be on your hands.
  • Maintain at least 1 metre (3 feet) distance between yourself and anyone who is coughing or sneezing.
    Why? When someone coughs or sneezes they spray small liquid droplets from their nose or mouth which may contain virus. If you are too close, you can breathe in the droplets, including the COVID-19 virus if the person coughing has the disease.
  • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth.
    Why? Hands touch many surfaces and can pick up viruses. Once contaminated, hands can transfer the virus to your eyes, nose or mouth. From there, the virus can enter your body and can make you sick.
  • Make sure you, and the people around you, follow good respiratory hygiene. This means covering your mouth and nose with your bent elbow or tissue when you cough or sneeze. Then dispose of the used tissue immediately.
    Why? Droplets spread virus. By following good respiratory hygiene you protect the people around you from viruses such as cold, flu and COVID-19.
  • Stay home if you feel unwell. If you have a fever, cough and difficulty breathing, seek medical attention and call in advance. Follow the directions of your local health authority.
    Why? National and local authorities will have the most up to date information on the situation in your area. Calling in advance will allow your health care provider to quickly direct you to the right health facility. This will also protect you and help prevent spread of viruses and other infections.
  • Keep up to date on the latest COVID-19 hotspots (cities or local areas where COVID-19 is spreading widely). If possible, avoid traveling to places – especially if you are an older person or have diabetes, heart or lung disease.
    Why? You have a higher chance of catching COVID-19 in one of these areas.

Household members, intimate partners, and caregivers in a nonhealthcare setting may have close contact2 with a person with symptomatic, laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 or a person under investigation. Close contacts should monitor their health; they should call their healthcare provider right away if they develop symptoms suggestive of COVID-19 (e.g., fever, cough, shortness of breath)

Close contacts should also follow these recommendations:

  • Make sure that you understand and can help the patient follow their healthcare provider’s instructions for medication(s) and care. You should help the patient with basic needs in the home and provide support for getting groceries, prescriptions, and other personal needs.
  • Monitor the patient’s symptoms. If the patient is getting sicker, call his or her healthcare provider and tell them that the patient has laboratory-confirmed COVID-19. This will help the healthcare provider’s office take steps to keep other people in the office or waiting room from getting infected. Ask the healthcare provider to call the local or state health department for additional guidance. If the patient has a medical emergency and you need to call 111, notify the dispatch personnel that the patient has, or is being evaluated for COVID-19.
  • Household members should stay in another room or be separated from the patient as much as possible. Household members should use a separate bedroom and bathroom, if available.
  • Prohibit visitors who do not have an essential need to be in the home.
  • Household members should care for any pets in the home. Do not handle pets or other animals while sick.  For more information, see COVID-19 and Animals.
  • Make sure that shared spaces in the home have good air flow, such as by an air conditioner or an opened window, weather permitting.
  • Perform hand hygiene frequently. Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains 60 to 95% alcohol, covering all surfaces of your hands and rubbing them together until they feel dry. Soap and water should be used preferentially if hands are visibly dirty.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • The patient should wear a facemask when you are around other people. If the patient is not able to wear a facemask (for example, because it causes trouble breathing), you, as the caregiver, should wear a mask when you are in the same room as the patient.
  • Wear a disposable facemask and gloves when you touch or have contact with the patient’s blood, stool, or body fluids, such as saliva, sputum, nasal mucus, vomit, urine.
    • Throw out disposable facemasks and gloves after using them. Do not reuse.
    • When removing personal protective equipment, first remove and dispose of gloves. Then, immediately clean your hands with soap and water or alcohol-based hand sanitizer. Next, remove and dispose of facemask, and immediately clean your hands again with soap and water or alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  • Avoid sharing household items with the patient. You should not share dishes, drinking glasses, cups, eating utensils, towels, bedding, or other items. After the patient uses these items, you should wash them thoroughly (see below “Wash laundry thoroughly”).
  • Clean all “high-touch” surfaces, such as counters, tabletops, doorknobs, bathroom fixtures, toilets, phones, keyboards, tablets, and bedside tables, every day. Also, clean any surfaces that may have blood, stool, or body fluids on them.
    • Use a household cleaning spray or wipe, according to the label instructions. Labels contain instructions for safe and effective use of the cleaning product including precautions you should take when applying the product, such as wearing gloves and making sure you have good ventilation during use of the product.
  • Wash laundry thoroughly.
    • Immediately remove and wash clothes or bedding that have blood, stool, or body fluids on them.
    • Wear disposable gloves while handling soiled items and keep soiled items away from your body. Clean your hands (with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand sanitizer) immediately after removing your gloves.
    • Read and follow directions on labels of laundry or clothing items and detergent. In general, using a normal laundry detergent according to washing machine instructions and dry thoroughly using the warmest temperatures recommended on the clothing label.
  • Place all used disposable gloves, facemasks, and other contaminated items in a lined container before disposing of them with other household waste. Clean your hands (with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand sanitizer) immediately after handling these items. Soap and water should be used preferentially if hands are visibly dirty.
  • Discuss any additional questions with your state or local health department or healthcare provider. Check available hours when contacting your local health department.

Older adults and people of any age who have serious underlying medical conditions may be at higher risk for more serious complications from COVID-19. These people who may be at higher risk of getting very sick from this illness, includes:

  • Older adults
  • People who have serious underlying medical conditions like:
    • Heart disease
    • Diabetes
    • Lung disease

If you are at higher risk of getting very sick from COVID-19, you should: stock up on supplies; take everyday precautions to keep space between yourself and others; when you go out in public, keep away from others who are sick; limit close contact and wash your hands often; and avoid crowds, cruise travel, and non-essential travel. If there is an outbreak in your community, stay home as much as possible. Watch for symptoms and emergency signs. If you get sick, stay home and call your doctor. More information on how to prepare, what to do if you get sick, and how communities and caregivers can support those at higher risk is available on People at Risk for Serious Illness from COVID-19.

Only wear a mask if you are ill with COVID-19 symptoms (especially coughing) or looking after someone who may have COVID-19. Disposable face mask can only be used once. If you are not ill or looking after someone who is ill then you are wasting a mask. There is a world-wide shortage of masks, so WHO urges people to use masks wisely.

WHO advises rational use of medical masks to avoid unnecessary wastage of precious resources and mis-use of masks (see Advice on the use of masks).

The most effective ways to protect yourself and others against COVID-19 are to frequently clean your hands, cover your cough with the bend of elbow or tissue and maintain a distance of at least 1 meter (3 feet) from people who are coughing or sneezing. See basic protective measures against the new coronavirus for more information.

What are the symptoms of COVID-19?

The most common symptoms of COVID-19 are fever, tiredness, and dry cough. Some patients may have aches and pains, nasal congestion, runny nose, sore throat or diarrhea. These symptoms are usually mild and begin gradually. Some people become infected but don’t develop any symptoms and don't feel unwell. Most people (about 80%) recover from the disease without needing special treatment. Around 1 out of every 6 people who gets COVID-19 becomes seriously ill and develops difficulty breathing. Older people, and those with underlying medical problems like high blood pressure, heart problems or diabetes, are more likely to develop serious illness. People with fever, cough and difficulty breathing should seek medical attention.

Read about COVID-19 Symptoms from CDC.gov.

Not everyone needs to be tested for COVID-19. For information about testing, see Testing for COVID-19.

The process and locations for testing vary from place to place. Contact your state, local, tribal, or territorial department for more information, or reach out to a medical provider. State and local public health departments have received tests from CDC while medical providers are getting tests developed by commercial manufacturers. While supplies of these tests are increasing, it may still be difficult to find someplace to get tested.

Using the CDC-developed diagnostic test, a negative result means that the virus that causes COVID-19 was not found in the person’s sample. In the early stages of infection, it is possible the virus will not be detected.

For COVID-19, a negative test result for a sample collected while a person has symptoms likely means that the COVID-19 virus is not causing their current illness.

What should I do if there is an outbreak in my community?

During an outbreak, stay calm and put your preparedness plan to work. Follow the steps below:

Protect yourself and others.

  • Stay home if you are sick. Keep away from people who are sick. Limit close contact with others as much as possible (about 6 feet).

Put your household plan into action.

  • Stay informed about the local COVID-19 situation. Be aware of temporary school dismissals in your area, as this may affect your household’s daily routine.
  • Continue practicing everyday preventive actions. Cover coughs and sneezes with a tissue and wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use a hand sanitizer that contains 60% alcohol. Clean frequently touched surfaces and objects daily using a regular household detergent and water.
  • Notify your workplace as soon as possible if your regular work schedule changes. Ask to work from home or take leave if you or someone in your household gets sick with COVID-19 symptoms, or if your child’s school is dismissed temporarily. Learn how businesses and employers can plan for and respond to COVID-19.
  • Stay in touch with others by phone or email. If you have a chronic medical condition and live alone, ask family, friends, and health care providers to check on you during an outbreak. Stay in touch with family and friends, especially those at increased risk of developing severe illness, such as older adults and people with severe chronic medical conditions.

Outbreaks can be stressful for adults and children. Talk with your children about the outbreak, try to stay calm, and reassure them that they are safe. If appropriate, explain to them that most illness from COVID-19 seems to be mild.

Children respond differently to stressful situations than adults

This is a new virus and we are still learning about it, but so far, there does not seem to be a lot of illness in children. Most illness, including serious illness, is happening in adults of working age and older adults. If there cases of COVID-19 that impact your child’s school, the school may dismiss students. Keep track of school dismissals in your community. Read or watch local media sources that report school dismissals. If schools are dismissed temporarily, use alternative childcare arrangements, if needed.

If your child/children become sick with COVID-19, notify their childcare facility or school. Talk with teachers about classroom assignments and activities they can do from home to keep up with their schoolwork.

Discourage children and teens from gathering in other public places while school is dismissed to help slow the spread of COVID-19 in the community.

Depending on the situation, public health officials may recommend community actions to reduce exposures to COVID-19, such as school dismissals. Read or watch local media sources that report school dismissals or and watch for communication from your child’s school. If schools are dismissed temporarily, discourage students and staff from gathering or socializing anywhere, like at a friend’s house, a favorite restaurant, or the local shopping mall.

Coronaviruses are generally thought to be spread from person-to-person through respiratory droplets. Currently there is no evidence to support transmission of COVID-19 associated with food. Before preparing or eating food it is important to always wash your hands with soap and water for 20 seconds for general food safety. Throughout the day wash your hands after blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing, or going to the bathroom.

It may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.

In general, because of poor survivability of these coronaviruses on surfaces, there is likely very low risk of spread from food products or packaging that are shipped over a period of days or weeks at ambient, refrigerated, or frozen temperatures.

Learn what is known about the spread of COVID-19.

Follow the advice of your local health officials. Stay home if you can. Talk to your employer to discuss working from home, taking leave if you or someone in your household gets sick with COVID-19 symptoms, or if your child’s school is dismissed temporarily. Employers should be aware that more employees may need to stay at home to care for sick children or other sick family members than is usual in case of a community outbreak.

COVID-19 virus can be transmitted in areas with hot and humid climates?

From the evidence so far, the COVID-19 virus can be transmitted in ALL AREAS, including areas with hot and humid weather. Regardless of climate, adopt protective measures if you live in, or travel to an area reporting COVID-19. The best way to protect yourself against COVID-19 is by frequently cleaning your hands. By doing this you eliminate viruses that may be on your hands and avoid infection that could occur by then touching your eyes, mouth, and nose.

There is no reason to believe that cold weather can kill the new coronavirus or other diseases. The normal human body temperature remains around 36.5°C to 37°C, regardless of the external temperature or weather. The most effective way to protect yourself against the new coronavirus is by frequently cleaning your hands with alcohol-based hand rub or washing them with soap and water.

Taking a hot bath will not prevent you from catching COVID-19. Your normal body temperature remains around 36.5°C to 37°C, regardless of the temperature of your bath or shower. Actually, taking a hot bath with extremely hot water can be harmful, as it can burn you. The best way to protect yourself against COVID-19 is by frequently cleaning your hands. By doing this you eliminate viruses that may be on your hands and avoid infection that could occur by then touching your eyes, mouth, and nose.

To date there has been no information nor evidence to suggest that the new coronavirus could be transmitted by mosquitoes. The new coronavirus is a respiratory virus which spreads primarily through droplets generated when an infected person coughs or sneezes, or through droplets of saliva or discharge from the nose. To protect yourself, clean your hands frequently with an alcohol-based hand rub or wash them with soap and water. Also, avoid close contact with anyone who is coughing and sneezing.

No. Hand dryers are not effective in killing the 2019-nCoV. To protect yourself against the new coronavirus, you should frequently clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand rub or wash them with soap and water. Once your hands are cleaned, you should dry them thoroughly by using paper towels or a warm air dryer.

UV lamps should not be used to sterilize hands or other areas of skin as UV radiation can cause skin irritation.

Thermal scanners are effective in detecting people who have developed a fever (i.e. have a higher than normal body temperature) because of infection with the new coronavirus.

However, they cannot detect people who are infected but are not yet sick with fever. This is because it takes between 2 and 10 days before people who are infected become sick and develop a fever.

No. Vaccines against pneumonia, such as pneumococcal vaccine and Haemophilus influenza type B (Hib) vaccine, do not provide protection against the new coronavirus.

The virus is so new and different that it needs its own vaccine. Researchers are trying to develop a vaccine against 2019-nCoV, and WHO is supporting their efforts.

Although these vaccines are not effective against 2019-nCoV, vaccination against respiratory illnesses is highly recommended to protect your health.

Remember the little things

BELONGING

We put a little video together of past remembrances of our district.
We the Vector Group team would like to acknowledge those gone before us, those tragically affected by Covid-19 and to our community and Nation who are reeling from current events. We would like to take this time to say we remember you; we remember those overseas, and for us at Vector, belonging is our highest value. Remembering the little things, they do count.

As we reflect on the past few years in our community, we are moved by so many circumstances, births, weddings, events, bullying, hardship, homelessness, collaboration, funders, Christmas, miracles, theatre, parades, short films, robberies, accidents, recoveries, disabilities and funerals. We have laughed, cried, had amazing accomplishments and had moments of fear and exhaustion.

We saw a young lady balling her eyes out today on side of road in TE PUKE. She was a tourist in a small van and stuck here in NZ. Please be kind people. We, who are from here and live here, are stressed out enough, but please put yourself in their shoes and show some humanity.

I know some towns have closed their borders, that is their call. But please, show compassion and care to everyone, especially foreigners, especially those who cannot get home to their families and are stuck here beyond their control who don't have the privilege we do.


It is times like this that show who we truly are and if we are an a#$hole community of individuals to others (not like ourselves), then we will always be remembered for that.

To all the tourists and visitors, we are so very sorry you are in this predicament and I hope we as Te Puke, WBOP, and as a nation show who we can be in a time that is apocalyptic and full of dread.

We love you all and we pray you be safe during this time. We are all in this together, one creed, one blood, one family. STAY SAFE – The Vector Group team #covid-19


Caring for someone at home

Most people who get sick with COVID-19 will have only mild illness and should recover at home. Care at home can help stop the spread of COVID-19

Ways to keep safe and healthy

Everyone should stay at home. This is the best thing we can all do to stop the spread of COVID-19. This will save lives. You can leave your house to access essential services, like buying groceries, or going to a bank or pharmacy.

If You Think You Are Sick

Vulnerable people in particular should stay at home and self-isolate.. If you are sick with COVID-19 or think you might have it, call your GP. If you do not have a GP, call Healthline for free on 0800 358 5453.



COVID-19 outbreak- information for our members and the community

The COVID-19 outbreak has now reached Aotearoa and will likely impact us all both professionally and personally as we deal with the implications of this outbreak.
We provide links to resources for you on how we can keep ourselves and our families safe and on ways to safeguard the wellbeing of clients and employees.

Ministry of Health resources for health professionals
https://www.health.govt.nz/our-work/diseases-and-conditions/covid-19-novel-coronavirus/covid-19-novel-coronavirus-information-specific-audiences/covid-19-novel-coronavirus-resources-health-professionals

Ministry of Health general information
https://www.health.govt.nz/our-work/diseases-and-conditions/covid-19-novel-coronavirus

The World Health Organisation has an excellent resource although aimed at frontline workers, makes important points on wellbeing
Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) Outbreak: rights, roles and responsibilities of health workers….
https://www.who.int/docs/default-source/coronaviruse/who-rights-roles-respon-hw-covid-19.pdf?sfvrsn=bcabd401_0

Safetravel website
https://www.safetravel.govt.nz/news/covid-19-coronavirus

Health Navigator New Zealand
Overview and information for health providers
https://www.healthnavigator.org.nz/health-a-z/c/coronavirus/#Overview

COVID-19 – information in other languages
https://www.health.govt.nz/our-work/diseases-and-conditions/covid-19-novel-coronavirus/covid-19-information-other-languages

This free collection includes relevant psychological research published across the APA Journals portfolio. We will update this collection on an ongoing basis.
COVID-19 relevant free journal articles

Workplace issues

Preparing your practice to deal with the coronavirus (COVID-19)1- FOR PRACTITIONERS (PDF) from the Australian Psychological Society

MBIE workplace response to COVID-19
https://www.mbie.govt.nz/about/open-government-and-official-information/coronavirus-covid-19

COVID-19 and psychology services: How to protect your patients and your practice  (APA resource)
https://www.apaservices.org/practice/news/covid19-psychology-services-protection

Workplace preparedness – Covid-19
https://worksafe.govt.nz/managing-health-and-safety/novel-coronavirus-covid-19/workplace-preparedness-for-novel-coronavirus

The University of AucklandClinics Viral Outbreak Process 2020 (PDF)

Working remotely / Teleworking

Allied Health Aotearoa Best Practice Guide for Telehealth (PDF)

NZ Telehealth COVID-19 and Telehealth Provision for Health Providers (PDF)

ACC– Guidelines for the use of telepsychology in treatment of ACC clients (PDF)

Checklist for remote provision of psychological services (WORD doc)– Adapted from APA checklist by Brian Dixon (Director, Scientific Issues, New Zealand Psychological Society)

Free CE series on telepsychology best practice For a limited time, APA’S four-part Continuing Education in Psychology series “Telepsychology Best Practice 101” is available free of charge.

Ring ring: telephone work at the end of the world | Notaguru
A fantastic resource for people who are new to, or uncertain about, telephone and online working  link

Effective therapy via video: top tips | British Psychological Society, Division of Clinical Psychology, Digital Healthcare Sub-Committee
Practical advice for professionals planning to offer video therapy  download

Cognitive Therapy for PTSD (CT-PTSD): Guidance for Conducting Memory Work Remotely | Oxford Center For Anxiety Disorders And Trauma
Excellent practical advice for conducting memory work in PTSS such as ‘reliving’  download

Tips related to remote therapy provision | BABCP  link

Mental Health & Wellbeing

Looking after mental health and wellbeing during COVID-19
https://www.mentalhealth.org.nz/get-help/covid-19

COVID-19, Top tips to get through
https://www.mentalhealth.org.nz/get-help/covid-19/top-tips-to-get-through/

RESPONDING TO THE COVID-19 OUTBREAK
https://www.mentalhealth.org.nz/assets/COVID-19/COVID-19-and-Stress.pdf

How COVID-19 may impact mental health
https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/the-future-brain/202003/how-covid-19-may-impact-mental-health

Briefing note on addressing mental health and psychosocial aspects of COVID-19 Outbreak– Version 1.1 (IASC) (PDF)

Save the Children:HOW TO TALK TO YOUR KIDS ABOUT CORONAVIRUS
https://www.savethechildren.org.nz/issues-and-concerns/covid-19

Talking to children about COVID-19: A parent resource
(National Association of School Psychologists- (Maryland, USA)
https://www.nasponline.org/resources-and-publications/resources-and-podcasts/school-climate-safety-and-crisis/health-crisis-resources/talking-to-children-about-covid-19-(coronavirus)-a-parent-resource

Media Advisory: Looking after mental health and wellbeing during Covid-19
https://www.mentalhealth.org.nz/home/news/article/288/media-advisory-looking-after-mental-health-and-wellbeing-during-covid-19

Answers to frequently asked questions about looking after mental health and wellbeing during COVID-19
https://www.mentalhealth.org.nz/get-help/covid-19/faqs/

Manage Anxiety & Stress
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prepare/managing-stress-anxiety.html

Coronavirus: Mental health experts Janet Peters and David Codyre on combating fear, anxiety
https://www.nzherald.co.nz/lifestyle/news/article.cfm?c_id=6&objectid=12318077

Here to help – COVID-19 and anxiety
https://www.heretohelp.bc.ca/infosheet/covid-19-and-anxiety

Tips for coping with coronavirus anxiety (PDF) from the Australian Psychological Society

Five ways to view coverage of the coronavirus  (American Psychological Assocation)
https://www.apa.org/helpcenter/pandemics

Easing anxiety in the wake of the coronavirus- Australian Psychological Society
https://www.wellnessdaily.com.au/health/easing-anxiety-in-the-wake-of-coronavirus

Coronavirus: psychologists offer advice for maintaining positive health- Australian Psychological Society
https://www.psychology.org.au/About-Us/news-and-media/Media-releases/2020/Coronavirus-psychologists-offer-advice-for-mainta

Information on preventing and responding to family, whānau and sexual violence during COVID-19
https://nzfvc.org.nz/Covid-19

Māori and Covid-19

NZ Māori Council issues comprehensive guidance on COVID-19 covering hui, tangi, gatherings and much more:
https://www.maorieverywhere.com/single-post/2020/03/18/NZ-Maori-Council-issues-comprehensive-guidance-on-COVID-19-covering-hui-tangi-gatherings-and-much-more

Te Rōpū Whakakaupapa Urutā – Guiding Māori through the COVID19 Panademic
http://www.uruta.maori.nz/

Preparing our whānau for self-isolation (PDF)

Potential situation scenario (PDF)

Pacific peoples and Covid-19

https://www.mpp.govt.nz/news-and-stories/covid-19-novel-coronavirus-update/

Working from home

Leaderships tips for keeping the team productive
http://www.culturebydesign.co.nz/what-we-do-and-why/articles/covid-19-4-leadership-tips-for-keeping-your-team-productive-while-working-from-home/

Working from home with children
https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2020/03/working-parents-school-closures-coronavirus/

Nine ways to make working from home easier 
https://thespinoff.co.nz/business/18-03-2020/nine-ways-to-make-working-from-home-easier-in-a-covid-19-world/

Five tips for working from home amid covid-19
https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/digital-leaders/202003/5-tips-working-home-amid-covid-19



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Vector Group Charitable Trust - Envisioning Sustainable Communities Creatively